Lumber prices started to rise as wildfires destroyed prime forests and Hurricane Irma temporarily shut down Florida and Georgia mills.

According to The Wall Street Journal, lumber prices started to rise as wildfires destroyed prime forests and Hurricane Irma temporarily shut down Florida and Georgia mills. A trade dispute between the U.S. and Canada, which supplies one-third of U.S. lumber, exacerbated the issue. And on top of that, a shortage of railcars and trucks has driven up transportation costs. WSJ reports:

Material prices now rival labor shortages as builders’ main concerns, a National Association of Home Builders survey showed in January. Prices for common building varieties like spruce and southern pine are at or near records, according to price-tracking publication Random Lengths. March-dated lumber futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange hit a record of $532.60 per 1,000 board feet last week after climbing more than 50% in 14 months.